Ethical Recognition of Marginalized Groups in Digital Games Culture

Dublin Core

Título

Ethical Recognition of Marginalized Groups in Digital Games Culture

Autor

Hammar Emil Lundendal

Data

2015

Colaborador

Leticia Rodrigues

Tipo

Journal Article

Zotero

Author

Hammar Emil Lundendal

Tipo de Item

Journal Article

Abstract Note

In this paper I argue that moral agents are obligated to include and pay respect to the equal treatment, equal opportunities and justice of groups and identities usually marked by marginalization, discrimination and/or oppression in the domain of digital games. As a result, I point towards how individual and collective moral agents in digital games culture can pay respect through recognition and affirmation of different groups and identities. At first I establish what constitutes a group and my definition of marginalization. This allows me to identify which specific groups are marginalized in digital games through a literature overview of different research into the representation and inclusion of said group identities. This demarcation and identification of marginalized groups allow me to further propose the ways in which marginalization and discrimination occurs and is reproduced in the domain of digital games. In turn, I propose the ways in which this marginalization and discrimination can be curbed through recognition and affirmation of marginalized groups. As such, I provide and identify the ethical aspects and general actions that moral agents are confronted with and called to act upon. This results in specific suggestions on how moral agents within the domain of digital games are morally obligated to include and pay respect to groups and identities usually marked by marginalization, discrimination, and oppression.

Data

2015

Título

Ethical Recognition of Marginalized Groups in Digital Games Culture

URL

http://www.digra.org/wp-content/uploads/digital-library/215_Hammar_Ethical-Recognition-of-Marginalized-Groups-in-Digital-Games-Culture.pdf

Attachment Title

Ethical Recognition of Marginalized Groups in Digital Games Culture | DiGRA